Why co-operation is paramount in the divorce process

24th November 2015

Why co-operation is paramount in the divorce process

judges court gavel and piggy bank, on white

Divorce is often a testing – and occasionally hostile – process, particularly if one party feels betrayed or let down by the other.

Contending with your own feelings or dealing with an emotionally hurt spouse can make a difficult situation harder still.

But while sensitivities may be running high, co-operating and negotiating an agreement fair to both individuals is of paramount importance. Not only will a swift conclusion to proceedings make life easier for you both, there is also a significant financial benefit.

The emotional implications aside, fighting it out in court is an expensive, drawn out remedy – one which Gotelee’s knowledgeable family law team can work with you to avoid.

Case study: Divorcee hit in pocket for ‘abysmal behaviour’

A recent case, involving a couple who had been married for 20 years and had assets of £1.5 million, highlights the financial implications when one party fails to co-operate in divorce proceedings.

What should have been a straightforward case was derailed by the husband’s extreme misconduct, which included a deluge of abusive and threatening emails against judges, his wife and her legal representatives.

The husband had been committed to prison for contempt after threatening to kill his wife and had been convicted by magistrates of assaulting her barrister. However, he skipped the sentencing hearing and fled abroad before continuing his email campaign. A warrant for his arrest was issued but that did not stop him from entering into a number of transactions which were designed to defeat his wife’s financial claims.

After finding that the husband had undisclosed assets of about £500,000, the High Court ordered the transfer of assets worth a total of £733,518 to the wife – around 49.5 per cent of the total marital assets. In response to his appalling behaviour, the husband was also ordered to pay £146,609 in legal costs.

The solution:

Gotelee’s lawyers, based in Ipswich, Hadleigh and Felixstowe, have years of experience and will ensure you receive appropriate guidance and practical support, including advice on how to get divorced, and the timescale, cost and implications for financial arrangements.

We are conscious of the fact that you may be concerned about the cost of legal advice, so we offer a fixed fee first appointment to hear about your situation and give you advice on solutions.

To make an appointment, call 01473 211121 or email info@gotelee.co.uk

Partner
Practice Areas
Children
Divorce
Separation
Chartered Legal Executive and Associate
Chartered Legal Executive, Associate
Chartered Legal Executive Associate
Blog Posts

Is your fulfilment business under threat?

07/08/2017

The Fulfilment House Due Diligence Scheme - the new weapon in the war on…

Read More
Upcoming Events

Gotelee Coffee Morning, Melton

12/10/2017

Join us again for another coffee morning, this time at our Melton office -…

Read More
News Posts

One in five trauma patients is injured on the road, data reveals

21/11/2017

One in every five patients admitted to the east of England's major trauma care…

Read More

Testimonials

"Pat Smith's efficient, calm, most capable, helpful and friendly manner."

- AG

"The patience and understanding from a sincere Miss Holland."

- AD

"Prompt, efficient and knowledgeable service"

- KB

"Clarity, plenty of information provided and responses in a timely manner"

- AG

"Mrs Tracey Hammond is very professional and helpful, efficient and very friendly"

- KS

"Judy Barfoot's approachable and knowledgeable professionalism was second to none"

- CM & SM

"Ms Stuart's friendly but direct approach. I always felt understood"

- JR

"Very flexible and accommodating, very positive & clearly explained my options"

- SD

"Friendly and approachable - using language I could understand"

- CV

"Efficient, polite, friendly service with very helpful advice"

- JA

Please select preferred method of contact

* We will only contact you by telephone if you select this as primary form of contact.